if the odds are against you, change the odds

A bevvy of artistic resources for capturing the characters and lands of Tamora Pierce's many works on paper

favorite fashionslehengas and sarees [pt.1]

(via bluandorange)

lleibio:

This reminds me of Briar

(By xBassxHarmingx - click the photo to visit the photo on deviantART)

(via fytortall)

art-of-swords:

Nine Ring Dao Sword

  • Dated: early 20th century
  • Culture: Chinese
  • Measurements: overall length 95 cm

The sword has a wide, curved, single-edged blade with a double groove. It features nine “teeth” at the back, each one provided with an iron ring. The typical, circular quillon is made of brass with relieved border and floral engravings. The grip has fabric binding and a wide ring at the edge.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

(via schoolofmaggiezine)

psdo:

vaporware-femme:

jennythepirate:

desdinova:

jennythepirate:

I haven’t posted progress in a million years. The chain suit is finished. All I have left is finishing the leather and casting the elf ears.

You did Merrill’s full-body chain?! It looks amazing, how did you do it? It must have taken SO much time and work! Err, I should ask, is it ok to reblog this? I just wanted my followers to see it.

Thanks:D Rebloging is fine. Your followers can also see my bathroom:D

It’s taken about 2 years. There are 20,000 aluminum rings (I think it was 16 gauge but I don’t remember.) The instructions for making the sleeves and making it fitted come from here http://homepage.ntlworld.com/trevor.barker/farisles/guilds/armour/mail.htm I also used the pants pattern from the Armor Archive. http://www.armourarchive.org/essays/book__practical_chainmail/practical_chainmail.shtml

I am reblogging this version too so my followers can see it and spread it like wild fire, this took two years of sticking to it and pure dedication

I have literally never seen something more badass, I’m like in cosplay tears over it and I remember you starting this forever ago and I remember liking it back then too. It is amazing to see and I hope I get to see pictures of the final product.

Seriously well done. Oh my frick.

wHAT

(via notjustanarmor)

saisonciel:

Winifred Lenihan as Joan of Arc, c. 1923

saisonciel:

Winifred Lenihan as Joan of Arc, c. 1923

(via maltair)


Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

(via maltair)

lovelyandbrown:

dynamicafrica:

(NSFW) Black Athletes in the ESPN’s 2014 Body Issue.

  • Serge Ibaka (Basketball)
  • Venus Williams (Tennis)
  • Aja Evans (Bobsleigh)
  • Nigel Sylvester (BMX)
  • Marshawn Lynch (American Football)
  • Prince Fielder (Baseball)
  • Larry Fitzgerald (American Football)
  • Bernard Hopkins (Boxing)

(more photos)

Yesssssss

(via queerhawkeye)

dollface-galactica:

calleeyuh:

Took my niece and nephew to have their pictures taken in their traditional Ethiopian clothing. Turned out too cute not to share. :)

OMG!

(via blackfashion)

supaslim:

Demonstration of talon flexion and extension in birds. Because the toes naturally flex when the legs are drawn to the body thanks to the pulley system of long tendons that control their feet, birds can perch without using any muscles, instead relying on their own body weight to keep them safely in place.

(via schoolofmaggiezine)

exitpursuedbyasloth:


corseque:


On your back is a less awkward way to carry an oversize sword, else you’d trip people with the sheath. Sometimes with really really really long swords, you can’t carry them at your waist at all - some are as long or longer than a man is tall, and would drag on the ground if you wore it at your waist. No, you’d normally want to carry it on your back, make your horse carry it, or carry it in a wagon.
Back in the day, you usually knew it when you were going into a big battle, so you could take the time to draw an enormous sword before the battle started. You’d have it in your hands as you went into battle, and you would actually use it more like a polearm than a sword.
A lot of video games and movies make it seem like you can draw a really long sword over your shoulder when it’s just not feasible. You would have to do it like Ned Stark does in the first episode. His sword Ice is quite oversized. There is zero way that Ned’s arm span would allow him to hold onto the sheath while drawing that sword all the way out, that’s why he has to have Theon hold the sheath while he draws it.

Jon Snow’s sword Longclaw is a bastard sword. It’s only a bit longer than a normal sword - he could draw it himself, but again, he’d have to take it off his back first. I looked around a bit for evidence.. in the last episode, he either has it already in his hand or he wears it at his waist, probably so he could draw it easily in case of Ygritte shenanigans.

I’d bet you a drink of the finest, finest booze that you’d never find an instance of Jon drawing that sword on-camera over his shoulder. Look at how long it is, it’s almost on the ground. I bet he’d have a hard time even drawing it from his waist.
I like how they had Sandor using the sword he wears at his waist during the riot - he had no time to take off his huge shoulder sword to undraw it, so he went for the quick draw. People did wear huge swords over their shoulder historically. My dismayed reaction in the other post was mostly bemusement / irritation that they made it seem like Sandor drew it over his shoulder when he went to fight Gregor, because the maneuver is impossible.
(Also, Sandor is never said in the books to have two swords, and it kind of bothers me. He resembles a sword rack a little bit. When would you ever need two swords? Either one or the other, Sandor. If he needed the enormous sword (for a big battle) he would know well in advance so he could go trade his normal sword for it. My question is, why does he wear it when he goes for the sword at his waist in an emergency anyway, and the dead weight sword on his back only hinders his movement? It doesn’t really make sense to me. I can only guess it’s just to look cool.
I wish he would trade his huge sword for a Clegane shield so it would resemble the book more and make more sense.)
Interesting wikipedia articles: Zweihänder - Two-handed sword - Nodachi


On the subject of two swords: samurai usually had two swords, a short sword for close quarter combat (can’t fight with a big-ass sword in a tight space, no room to swing it), and a longer-sword for open-air combat or battle situation (so you can stay as far away from the dude trying to kill you and still kill him).
If Sandor routinely carries around two swords, it could just be being cautious, as he never knows from day to day how he’s gonna need to kill some people. He may only use one in any given situation, but better safe than disemboweled. Or maybe Joffrey just wants to strap as many weapons to his Dog as he can, like Pimp My Bodyguard thing. “Carry this sword. And this one. This one too. Don’t forget your dagger. And your morning star. And these shuriken. And the Tesseract. And this board with nails in it. And these lasers, always gotta have lasers. And this mouthful of bees so when you bark at people you shoot bees at them.”
As far as the Gregor fight, he probably used the longsword to match his brother’s own reach with his longsword. But he doesn’t draw it from his back, he takes it off to draw it. During the fight he’s not wearing the scabbard and sword belt thing that he wears across his chest like a bandolier, and you can see him throwing it to the ground if you ignore all the brotherly love going on.


Is it known how long the Hound’s sword is (haha, did I just type that?), would he be able to draw it on it’s own? He has no Theon to hold his scabbard for him, so I don’t know if he’d own a sword he couldn’t draw on his own.
Although you’re right in that he really didn’t have time yank off his sword belt and draw his sword (he had about 2 seconds in which to do it), but that’s could be blamed on weak editing from trying to make the scene fast-paced and intense, without allowing time enough for everything to happen. Which I think is the case as it appears the scene was longer when shot, as Loras’s shield, which was unblemished even after he unhorsed Gregor, had half-a-dozen or more gouges in it, though we only heard Gregor’s sword strike it twice. Or maybe Sandor just used some of the same time/space distorting magic Littlefinger uses to teleport around Westeros.

exitpursuedbyasloth:

corseque:

On your back is a less awkward way to carry an oversize sword, else you’d trip people with the sheath. Sometimes with really really really long swords, you can’t carry them at your waist at all - some are as long or longer than a man is tall, and would drag on the ground if you wore it at your waist. No, you’d normally want to carry it on your back, make your horse carry it, or carry it in a wagon.

Back in the day, you usually knew it when you were going into a big battle, so you could take the time to draw an enormous sword before the battle started. You’d have it in your hands as you went into battle, and you would actually use it more like a polearm than a sword.

A lot of video games and movies make it seem like you can draw a really long sword over your shoulder when it’s just not feasible. You would have to do it like Ned Stark does in the first episode. His sword Ice is quite oversized. There is zero way that Ned’s arm span would allow him to hold onto the sheath while drawing that sword all the way out, that’s why he has to have Theon hold the sheath while he draws it.

image

Jon Snow’s sword Longclaw is a bastard sword. It’s only a bit longer than a normal sword - he could draw it himself, but again, he’d have to take it off his back first. I looked around a bit for evidence.. in the last episode, he either has it already in his hand or he wears it at his waist, probably so he could draw it easily in case of Ygritte shenanigans.

image

I’d bet you a drink of the finest, finest booze that you’d never find an instance of Jon drawing that sword on-camera over his shoulder. Look at how long it is, it’s almost on the ground. I bet he’d have a hard time even drawing it from his waist.

I like how they had Sandor using the sword he wears at his waist during the riot - he had no time to take off his huge shoulder sword to undraw it, so he went for the quick draw. People did wear huge swords over their shoulder historically. My dismayed reaction in the other post was mostly bemusement / irritation that they made it seem like Sandor drew it over his shoulder when he went to fight Gregor, because the maneuver is impossible.

(Also, Sandor is never said in the books to have two swords, and it kind of bothers me. He resembles a sword rack a little bit. When would you ever need two swords? Either one or the other, Sandor. If he needed the enormous sword (for a big battle) he would know well in advance so he could go trade his normal sword for it. My question is, why does he wear it when he goes for the sword at his waist in an emergency anyway, and the dead weight sword on his back only hinders his movement? It doesn’t really make sense to me. I can only guess it’s just to look cool.

I wish he would trade his huge sword for a Clegane shield so it would resemble the book more and make more sense.)

Interesting wikipedia articles: Zweihänder - Two-handed sword - Nodachi

On the subject of two swords: samurai usually had two swords, a short sword for close quarter combat (can’t fight with a big-ass sword in a tight space, no room to swing it), and a longer-sword for open-air combat or battle situation (so you can stay as far away from the dude trying to kill you and still kill him).

If Sandor routinely carries around two swords, it could just be being cautious, as he never knows from day to day how he’s gonna need to kill some people. He may only use one in any given situation, but better safe than disemboweled. Or maybe Joffrey just wants to strap as many weapons to his Dog as he can, like Pimp My Bodyguard thing. “Carry this sword. And this one. This one too. Don’t forget your dagger. And your morning star. And these shuriken. And the Tesseract. And this board with nails in it. And these lasers, always gotta have lasers. And this mouthful of bees so when you bark at people you shoot bees at them.”

As far as the Gregor fight, he probably used the longsword to match his brother’s own reach with his longsword. But he doesn’t draw it from his back, he takes it off to draw it. During the fight he’s not wearing the scabbard and sword belt thing that he wears across his chest like a bandolier, and you can see him throwing it to the ground if you ignore all the brotherly love going on.

image

image

Is it known how long the Hound’s sword is (haha, did I just type that?), would he be able to draw it on it’s own? He has no Theon to hold his scabbard for him, so I don’t know if he’d own a sword he couldn’t draw on his own.

Although you’re right in that he really didn’t have time yank off his sword belt and draw his sword (he had about 2 seconds in which to do it), but that’s could be blamed on weak editing from trying to make the scene fast-paced and intense, without allowing time enough for everything to happen. Which I think is the case as it appears the scene was longer when shot, as Loras’s shield, which was unblemished even after he unhorsed Gregor, had half-a-dozen or more gouges in it, though we only heard Gregor’s sword strike it twice. Or maybe Sandor just used some of the same time/space distorting magic Littlefinger uses to teleport around Westeros.

(via notjustanarmor)